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Lost Distilleries 1885-1945


LOST SCOTCH MALT WHISKY DISTILLERIES 1885-1945.
Copyright © Ulf Buxrud 2000.
If you 'lend' this text from my book then give proper credit please.

NB: A few errors have deliberatly been inserted to enable trace of abuse; eg. non-authorised copy of the text.

The first compilation of the standard and status of the ongoing distilling enterprises and their activities was performed by Mr Alfred Barnard. He travelled the British Isles as a one-man expedition and with the aim to scrutinise and thoroughly document the whereabouts of each and every one of the facilities. His enormous task was carried out during the years of 1885 to 1887 and resulted in the classic 'The Whisky Distilleries of the United Kingdom', a 500 pages volume which left the printing presses 1887 . Sadly only a dozen or so copies are known to have survived today, however a facsimile reprint of his complete work was issued in 1987 (last known price for one of the few known originals was 2.500 (end 2006), faximile (best is David & Charles) goes for 120+ (2006) its ISBN is 1-85158-087-5 and contains 476 pages). Barnard also wrote series of rare and hard to find pamphlets, of which 5 are known. One is concerning Dalmore and and another one was reprinted by the local Museum on Islay 2005. An identical journey was performed, one hundred year after the publishing of Barnard's monumental master thesis, by the author and journalist Philip Morrice (The whisky distilleries of Scotland and Ireland, Publ 1987, Harper /London, No ISBN, 369 pages, printed in 1.000 copies, Rare, last price 450 (2006). Following in Barnard's footstep he to visited every distillery that had survived from the days of Barnard, as well as the newcomers. By comparing these two masterpieces one easily find a group of distilleries that did not survived to our days. The historic data for these distilleries, born before as well as after Barnard's mapping, but deceased before 1945 are included in this chapter. Most of these distilleries are literally lost not only their structures but also the fluid they once produced. In modern time, and at a few rare occasions, stray bottles from these vanished shrines have surfaced at auctions. In cases were ownership is known a note is given but the identity of the collectors are not disclosed.

As these production units not only left a massive imprint in the history of the development but also to a large extent contributed to the foundation of the whisky culture they more than well deserve an entry in this volume. The following is a compilation of the ones lost between Barnard's vast journey and 1945. The distilleries and their whereabouts have been listed by alphabetic order and marked out on the accompanying map (not included here) for easy reference. As many of the distilleries were known under different names, from time to time, I have listed them under the name the were most wideley know. Included, per distillery, are all known name versions.

Not included are the 100 distilleries or so, licensed and incorporated, but defunct before Barnard's documentation. Little is known regarding these except dates of license. They were in general very small and operated locally as a 'cottage-workshop' serving the nearest pub and village but vanished without trace except in the local mythology. A few exceptions are Octomore and Tallant on Islay though, which left some vague physical traces in the terrain. The comprehensive compilation ''The Scotch Whisky Industry Record" by Charles Craig (Publ 1994, Index Publishing/UK, ISBN 0-9522646-0-9, 659 pages, 85 (1994) provides basic distillery data for the previous era not covered here.

It can be said that most of the distilleries visited by Barnard more or less came to existence as a result of the late Victorian boom that eventually ended in 1899. The boom started with the surge for replacement when the brandy industry collapsed due to the devastating wine louse (phylloxera). All together it was 71 distilleries that all became obsolete before 1945. Of these, eleven was founded after Alfred Barnard's mapping in 1885-1887. Some remained or became converted (3) from Malt whisky to Grain whisky distilleries during the period. Geographically speaking, the group consisted of 26 Lowland, 24 Highland, 20 Campbeltown and 1 Islay distilleries. The closing frequency, distributed per decade, was 1880-1889 (1), 1890-1899 (3), 1900-1909 (7), 1910-1919 (13) 1920-1929 (42) and 1930-1945 (5). The major slaughter occurred in the twenties. And it was not only the Depression but initially also the loss of export to an USA under Prohibition (1920-1933) that was the main reasons.

Several of the many and rather small distilleries in the Campbeltown area became obsolete due to the larger and more efficient ones who absorbed most of capital and local manpower available. This consolidation process started in the midst of the US prohibition and as a result of the new-born 'Golden trade', a poetic name for the smuggler trade. As Campeltown is the deep-water port nearest to the US and was cram- packed with distilleries it became the natural site for production and shipping of the nectar to an almost dried up subcontinent. The transatlantic crave for the whiskies led to the mentioned concentration of local resources. The previous decade also experienced a dramatic change. This time it was the emerging war that was the culprit plus the formation of the Scotch Malt Distilleries Ltd. (SMD) trust in 1914. By the 1935 the SMD owned or managed fifty-one Malt whisky distilleries; a copy of the successful formation of Distillers Company Ltd. (DCL) who consolidated the Grain whisky trade half a century earlier. SMD's aspiration for control lead to the closing of several smaller and less effective units.

A SPECIAL STUDY REGARDING LOST ISLAY DISTILLERIES IS FOUND AT THE END OF THE PAGE.

DISTILLERIES LOST 1885-1945


1. Adelphi (Lowland).
Aka Loch Katrine and Gorbals (not to be mixed with Loch Katrine of Camlachie). A Malt and Grain distillery founded 1825 by the two brothers Charles and David Gray. It was located at Muirhead Street in Glasgow on the south bank of the River Clyde at the heart of Glasgow. It was once a well-known landmark in the Gorbals area of the city. By 1880 it had grown into one of the largest and most technically advanced distilleries in Scotland. Production was in excess of 500,000 gallons per annum during the 80's and 90's. It had 4 Pot stills and 12/16.000 gallon washbacks. The water was drawn via vast pipeline from Loch Katrine. About 1880 a new owner, Archibald Walker and Co, took control. He also owned the distillery at Limerick and the Vauxhall distillery in Liverpool. Walkers injected new capital and installed a large Coffey still for grain whisky production, and one Coffey still for malt whisky production! Sadly, Adelphi became one of the first victims when the late Victorian boom collapsed. And closed in 1907. Last visible structure, the chimney came down 1971. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

2. Albyn (Campbeltown).
Founded 1830 by William McKersie and located in The Roading near the gasworks of Millknowe, Campbeltown. It was a small family business during its existence, with 3 Pot stills, 6/5.000 gallons washbacks and an annual production of 85.000 gallons. Water was drawn from Crosshill Lochs. Closed 1920. Demolished 1929 and the site is re-used for a modern factory. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

3. Annandale (Lowland).
Founded 1830 by George Donald a former excise officer and operated by him for forty years. A John Garner leased it 1883-87 after which it was taken John Walker & Sons Ltd. Who closed it 1919. It was located a mile north of Annan in Dumfriesshire. With its 2 Pot stills, 4/3.600 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 28.000 gallons. Water was drawn from Gullielands Burn. The distillery now a farm, has been very well persevered to this day. A gem to visit. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

4. Ardgowan (Lowland).
A Grain distillery built a group of Blenders. Founded 1896 and acquired by DCL in 1902. It was located at Baker Street in Grenock. Production figures are not known. The continuous still is believed to have been a Coffey still. Suffered a five day long fire in 1903 that cost several lives. Finally closed 1907 after the last stock was sold. Some years later the premises was used by DCL for yeast production as well as Grain spirit and industrial alcohol. Once again engulfed by flames, now during the May Blitz of 1941 (like Banff). The production unit was restored within a month but the rest of the plant stayed in ruins. Finally abandoned 1952. Demolished. Not visited by Alfred Barnard.

5. Ardlussa (Campbeltown).
Founded 1879 by the firm James Fergusson and sold to West Highland malt Distilleries Ltd in 1919. It was located next to Glen Nevis at Glebe Street in Campbeltown. With its 2 Pot stills, 6/8.200 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 118.000 gallons. Water was drawn from Gullielands Burn. Closed 1924. Liquidated 1927, but and plant was intact for many years and was turned into a blending and bottling plant 1936. Now demolished after being used as works yard for a major contractor. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

6. Argyll (Campbeltown).
Founded 1844 and the second one with the same name. The previous became obsolete during the 1840's. The new one was located off Longrow Street in Campbeltown and close to Hazelburn. Founders were Robert Colvill and the brothers Hugh and Robert Greenlees. With 2 small Pot stills, 5/3.900 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 40.000 gallons. Water was drawn from the mains a well on site. The surviving partner, Robert Greenlees sold out to Ainslie & Heilbron Ltd. in 1920. A&H later became acquired by DCL who stopped production in 1923. Premises sold by DCL in 1929 and the still standing building was converted to a garage and petrol station. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

7. Auchinblae (Highland).
Founded 1896 by a public company set up for the enterprise. It was using buildings of a spinning mill built 1795 and was l Located in Auchinblae of Kincardineshire. With 2 Pot stills, 4/6.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of approximate 100.000 gallons. Water was piped from an uphill spring at Templebank to a still standing large, stone-built, cistern. Closed 1929. Kiln, turbine and water cistern that once stored the distillery's process water remains. An empty bottle from the distillery's heydays is said to have survived. Not visited by Alfred Barnard.

8. Auchnagie (Highland).
Founded 1812 by James Duff (1827-33) it shifted hands several times until it was finally acquired by John Dewar & Sons Ltd. in 1890 and closed by them 1911. It was and located in Tulliemet, near Ballinuig of Perthshire. It is believed that 2 Pot stills were installed and that it had annual maximum production of 24.000 gallons. Water was drawn from Auchnagie Hills. The spirit store and some walls still stand. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887 but closed for the season.

9. Auchtermuchty (Lowland).
Aka Stratheden. Founded 1829 by the Bonthrone family who ran the distillery for three generations. It was located in Auchtermuchty of Fife. With 2 small Pot stills, one an old illegal still bought from a smuggler in 1825 and 6/2.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 30.000 gallons. Water was aqueducted from Lovers Pool. Closed 1926 due to recession and was unusually not absorbed by neither DCL nor SMD. Most of the buildings remain. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

10. Auchtertool (Lowland).
Founded 1845 and located four miles west of Kirkcaldy, Fife. First licensee was James Liddell & Co. who operated the distillery to 1868. Then it was dormant until 1883 when it was put into production again by Walter Bartholowme. In 1896 it was acquired by Robertson, Sanderson & Co. that in turn was bought by DCL in 1923. With 2 Pot stills, 8/2.780 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 86.000 gallons. DCL closed the distillery 1927 but operated the maltings until 1973. Now replaced by a housing estate and completely lost. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

11. Ballechin (Highland).
Founded 1810 by a group of farmers 1927 and located at Strath Tay, near Ballinuig of Perthshire. Later, it was operated by an in of individuals all related to the founders. Starting with Peter Kennedy (1818-1819) and ending with Robert Kennedy (1835-1875). In 1875 it was acquired by Robertson & Sons. Dormant from 1913 it went into full swing 1923 under the management of William, who had bought the entire estate, but finally closed 1927 and converted to a farm. With 2 small Pot stills 5/1.800 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 18.000 gallons. Some buildings survived and are used by the farm. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

12. Bankier (Lowland).
Originally a corn mill it was converted and founded as a malt whisky distillery 1828 by Daniel MacFarlane. In 1878 it was acquired by James Risk and by James Buchanan in 1903. It was passed over to DCL in 1925 who closed it in 1928 but used the maltings until 1971 and the warehouses until the late 1980's. It was located in Denny of Stirlingshire. With 1 wash and 2 spirit Pot stills and 5/12.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 150.000 gallons. Water was drawn from Droups Stream. Last buildings demolished in 1990. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

13. Benachie (Highland).
Aka Jericho. Founded 1824 by William Smith, passed further to John Maitland in 1864 and after his death in the early 1880's acquired by his brothers-in-law who ran it for another 30 years, until 1913. Attempt to restart production 1920 failed and the company was liquidated as late as 1960. It was located in Insch of Aberdeenshire. With 2 Pot stills and 4/3.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 150.000 gallons. Water was drawn from the stream Jordan! Closed 1915. Some relics intact. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

14. Benmore (Campbeltown).
Founded 1868 by the distilling and blending group Bulloch Lade who also operated Camlachie (aka Loch Katrine) in Glasgow. Became acquired 1920 by a holding firm who also controlled Lochhead, Lochindaal and Dallas Dhu. Located at Sadell Street in Campbeltown facing Kinloch Park. It was probably the first in town with a pagoda roof. When it lost its chimney in a gale. With 2 Pot stills and 6/5.400 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 125.000 gallons. Water was drawn from on-site wells and by mains. Closed 1927 and absorbed by DCL in 1929. Sold to Craig Brothers in 1936 who converted it into a central bus garage for their motor services. Buildings survived to this day. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

15. Ben Wyvis/Ferintosh (Highland)
The name Ben Wyvis has been re-used by Invergordon Grain Distillery for a short period (1965-1977). The name was given to their two-pot-still malt whisky distillery situated on their premisses. Ferintosh is a reviving of an 'umbrella-name' name given to lost destilleries operated by the Forbes family until 1784. Ben Wyvis, located in Dingwall, Ross-shire, was founded 1879 by D.G Ross and sold 1887 to Scotch Whisky Distillers. SWD wound up 1889. Liquidators sold Ben Wyvis to the Ferintosh Distillery Co. Ltd. in 1893, a subsidiary to Kirker, Greer &Co. in Belfast. The new owner changed the name from Ben Wyvis to 'Ferintosh' the same year. In 1914 the control was passed to the Distillers Finance Corporation in Belfast. This company became acquired by DCL in 1922. DCL decided to close the distillery 1926. SMD used the still standing warehouses until 1980. Maltbarns and granaries are more or less gone. The office building is now a business center. Premisses sold to a housing complex developer in 1993. With 2 Pot stills and 4/13.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 160.000 gallons. Water was drawn from Loch Ussie via a four miles long pipe line. Barnard was very impressed with this destillery and he considered it to be well ahead of its time. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

16. Bon Accord (Highland).
Aka North of Scotland. Located in Aberdeen, it was founded 1855 on the remains of a brewery established 1785 that went burst 1854 and a distillery (Union Glen) experiencing the same faith in 1853. Bon Accord became the largest Pot still distillery in Northern Scotland after a few years of operation. Over the years, the distillery suffered several fires, the worst in 1885. Production was halted for a long period and never fully recovered. The owners liquidated in 1896 and the facilities were taken over by Dailuaine-Talisker Distillers Ltd the same year. Operation was resumed and now under a new name: North of Scotland Distillery. As it failed to thrive it was closed 1913. Suffered another devastating fire in 1910.With 2 Pot stills and 6/10.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 300.000 gallons. Demolished, part of the site is now housing. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

17. Bo'ness (Lowland).
Founded 1813 as a partnership between Messrs Todd, Padon, and Vannen until 1929 where after it was ran by Mr Vannen alone until 1873 when it was acquired by James Calder. He dismantles the post stills and installed Coffey stills, producing 870.000 gallons a year, in 1876 hence converting it to a grain whisky distillery. In 1921 it was sold to John Dewar and passed further to DCL in 1925 who closed it down the same year. It was located at Pan's Braes in Bo'ness of West Lothian. For period in time it was Britain's main yeast factory. The warehouses were used by DCL until modern times but the entire plant is now completely demolished. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

18. Burnside (Campbeltown).
Founded 1825 by five initial partners. Transferred to Colvil & Greenlees in 1840, also owner of Argyll. Was closed for periods from 1888 till 1918 when production resumed on and off until 1924 when it finally closed. Located at Witchburn Road on the slopes of Ben Gullion half a mile from centre of Campbeltown. With 2 Pot stills and 6/5.500 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 100.000 gallons. Converted to creamery and has remained one until today. Buildings are still intact. closed 1924. The re-used by Springbank and previous by Balvenie. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

19. Campbeltown (Campbeltown).
Founded 1815 and was the first major legitimate distillery in Longrow street of Campbeltown. It started as a partnership between John MacTaggart and John Beth a banker. Was sold to Charles Rowatt 1835 who leased it to Hector Henderson. In 1852 it was named as the Campbeltown Distillery Co. Production was going on until 1924. With 2 Pot stills and 5/3.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 60.000 gallons. Water was drawn from mains. Some of the buildings remains and are today used by an automobile dealership. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

20. Clydesdale (Lowland).
Aka Wishaw. Founded 1825 by Robert Montgomery, eight Lord of Belhaven. It was located at Glasgow Road in Wishaw of Lanarkshire. From the beginning it was leased to several distillers. In 1848 it was sold to Patrick Chalmers' Wishaw Distillery Co. and Lord Belhaven withdrew. Chalmers died in 1855 and production halted. Chalmer's son-in-law J. Munroe Mackenzie took over a few years later and was the first one make profit from the operation. He changed the name from Wishaw to Clydesdale Distillery. Clydesdale was one of the five distilleries that founded Scottish Malt Distilleries (SMD) in 1914. Clydesdale closed 1919 when SMD was absorbed by DCL. Its bonded warehouses were used for several years, trough WW II and into the mid 1980's. In 1988 the site was finally demolished and re-developed. With 4 Pot stills and 4/18.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 170.000 gallons. Water was drawn Cambusnethan peat moss. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.


21. Dalaruan (Campbeltown).
Founded 1824 by Charles Colvill, David Colville, a banker and Daniel Greenlees of Hazelburn and in 1838 joined by John McMurchy of Burnside It was located at Broad Street in the Lochend the classic part of Campbeltown. The distillery had an un-dramatic history, went through modernising at intervals and but suffered as many others from recession and finally closed 1922. With its 3 Pot stills and 7 washbacks it had an annual production of 112.000 gallons. Demolished and since the mid 1930's covered by a housing estate called Parliament Place. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

22. Dalintober (Campbeltown).
Founded 1832 by Reid & Colville who ran the company until 1919 when it was acquired by West Highland Distillers Ltd. It was located at Queen Street in Campbeltown and overlooking Kinloch Park. With its 3 Pot stills and 6/8.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 170.000 gallons. Water was drawn the hills and a deep well on the premises. Again recession claimed its toll and the distillery came to rest in 1925. Dalintober is now demolished and the site is now used for housing. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

23. Dean (Lowland).
Founded 1881 by James Johnstone, owner to Glenpatrick distillery and bought by Scotch Whisky Distillers Ltd 1887 including Glenpatrick. At the same time they acquired Glen Nevis, Glendarroch and Ben Waives. SWD went into liquidation in the 1890's and Dean was mothballed for several years. Around 1908 it was purchased by Robert Barr who ran it for a dozen of year but suffered from the steep decline of economy after WW I and had to sell to eternal buyer SMD in 1922. Later, the same year they closed the distillery. The distillery was housed in converted flour mill on the bank of Leith near the Dean Bridge and Charlotte Square in Edinburgh. 24. With its 2 Pot stills and 5/9.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 170.000 gallons. Water drawn was city water. Some of the buildings remain converted to residence and offices. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

24. Devanha (Highland).
Founded 1825 as brewery whose owner added a distillery on the premises 1837. Later, in 1852 it was acquired by William Black & Co. who operated it until 1910. It is believed that new owners operated the distillery until 1915 when it definitely shut its doors. It was situated on the north-west side the Dee, between the river and the railway in an area with the same name in the city of Aberdeen. With its 2 Pot stills and 14/4.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 220.000 gallons. Water for process was city water and water for cooling was drawn from river Dee. The buildings, very modernised are still standing. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

25. Drumcaldie (Lowland).
Aka Fife Distillery. Founded 1896 by the Glenleven Distillery Co. as Drumcaldie and renamed itself to Fife Distillery Co. Ltd. in conjunction with its opening or shortly thereafter. Badly managed it wound after a short period of production and never got a second wind. After seven years in business it closed it doors (1903) forever. This distillery goes to the history as the most short-lived one and as sad story of speculation and bad management. Means, size of production and water source is not known at the time of writing. It was housed in a former bleechwork and situated just opposite the Cameronbridge Grain whisky complex who, via DCL, bought the plant and used it for maltings and warehousing for several years. Some relics are intact. Not visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

26. Dundashill (Lowland).
Founded 1770, it is believed. However in 1812 there was for sure a distillery on the premises. Founder was John Haig. Over the following three and a half decade it went into a string of different ownership, from Thomas Harvie, Glasgow Distillery Co., R. Harvey and finally Harvey McFarlane & Co. for the period 1841- 1846. That year the company was dissolved. The firm John & Robert Harvey & Co. took over and ran it for more than fifty years and into the next century. It did not survived. Financially bleeding it had to close 1902 and was sold to DCL following year. DCL removed all equipment and merged the remains with their Port Dundas distillery. Dundashill was situated beside the canal wharves at Port Dundas and close to the Port Dundas Grain distillery. Both giant distilleries that by comparison dwarfed any other distillery in Scotland. Two types of malt whisky was made, both sold as single and used as well for blending purposes; the classic old still malt (dried without peat) and Highland malt (dried by peat fires). As traditionalists the firm long refused to follow the wave and implemented the contiguous still technique. However, due to finical distress a Coffey still was installed 1899 and three years later the firm wound up. With its 2 wash, 10 spirit Pot stills and 9/16-24.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production average of 340.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Loch Katrine and water for cooling was drawn from the canal. Used as cooperage until modern days. Now demolished and replaced with a housing complex. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

27. Edinburgh (Lowland).
Aka West Scienes (1849), Newington (1851), Glen Sciennes (1856), Edinburgh since 1859. Founded 1849 by Alexander Pearson who bought and tried to convert an old brewery founded 1430 to a state of the art distillery. Funds were depleted the year after, due the costly conversion, and the project was taken over by Thomas Duncanson 1851. He first named it Newington and later Glen Sciennes. In 1859 it was acquired by the famous Andrew 'Green Stripe' Usher who renamed it to Edinburgh Distillery. In 1919 the Usher's sold it to SMD who closed it in 1925. The distillery was situated in the Newington area south of The Meadows and Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh. With its 2 Pot stills and 13/2.700 gallon washbacks it had an annual production average of 132.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Pentland Hills. A building, believed to be the office building, survived. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

28. Gartloch (Lowland).
Founded 1897 by Northern Distillers Ltd. who also owned Gerston II (Ben Morven). The company was liquidated shortly thereafter (1900). The bondholders sold the assets to James Calder & Co. in 1902, owner to Bo'ness who ran it until 1920. Gartloch and Bo'ness was acquired by DCL 1920 and closed them the same year. The distillery, a Grain distillery and equipped with a Coffey still, was located in Chryston, near Garnkirk of Lanarkshire. Production figures are not known at time of writing. The warehouses remained in use for some years but today no traces are left. Not visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

29. Gerston (Highland).
Aka Ben Morven (1897). Founded 1886 by a London company as a replacement for the Gerston I that closed 1975 and became demolished 1882. It was not a commercial success and was sold to Northern Distilleries in 1897. They renamed it Ben Morven after a nearby hill. According to one source the distillery wound up 1900 and the distillery closed the same year but a local press clip says it operated as late as 1911 and yet another that the final closing occurred 1914. It was located between the Gerston Farm and Halkirk Bridge in Halkirk. With its 2 Pot stills it had an annual production of 80.000 gallons but was god for the double. Water was drawn from Calder Burn. A young William Grant, second son to William Grant of Glenfiddich was employed as a bookkeeper. The tunnel aqueduct and some house remains as separate private residences. Nearby there are some relics from Gerston I as well. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

30. Glenaden (Highland).
Aka Glenadon. Founded 1845 by Messrs Milne & Co. and sold to George Wilson & Co. in 1882 who turn passed it further to Yelton, Ogilvie & Co. 1903. As farm-based and very small producer, de facto Scotland's smallest distillery at that time, it did not survive the increased cost of operation and distribution and had to close at 1915.82 It was located in Aberdeenshire in the village Old Deer on the south bank of the River Deer. With its 2 Pot stills had an annual production average of 12.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Biffie Springs. Demolished no trace. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

31. Glencawdor (Highland).
Founded 1898 by Messrs. J. Mill of Nairn, D. McAndie of Inverness and J. MacKillican of Calcutta. Distilling started in 1897 and ran until 1901 when the company was dissolved. John Haigh & Co. acquired the assets in 1903 and operated it until 1927 when the late 1920' depression forced them to halt production in 1927. The selected location was near the river Nairn and close to a railway viaduct serving the Inverness-Elgin route. With its 2 Pot stills it is believed it had an annual production of 80.000 gallons in average. Water for was drawn from local springs. The facility was completely demolished in 1930 and no traces were left except for the stones that were re-used when the Broadhill housing estate was erected. It was build according to plans drawn up by Charles C. Doig, inventor of the famous pagoda roofs that decorates malt kilns all over Scotland. Not visited by Alfred Barnard.

32. Glencoull (Highland).
Founded 1897 as a partnership between Messrs G Willsher a wine and spirit merchant and G. Duncan a distiller from Northern Ireland. The partnership did not work at very well and was dissolved 1899 with Duncan departing. The relay baton was handed over to the firm G, Wilsher & Son in 1901 who ran it until 1913. That year they bankrupted and sold the distillery back to the founder George Duncan who in the meantime had became a distiller at Dean Distillery in Edinburgh. He ran the distillery until 1927 when it finally closed due to the financial bad times. It was located in Justinhaug near Forfar in Angus. It had 2 Pot stills but size of washbacks and annual production is not known at the time of writing. Water for process was drawn from a nearby stream and river. Some of the buildings were demolished in 1934 and the remaining part was converted to a grain mill that is still standing. Not visited by Alfred Barnard.

33. Glendarroch (Highland).
Aka Glengilp/Glengilph (1831), Glendarroch (1878) and Glenfyne 1887. Founded 1831 by Henry Hoey & Co. as the Glenfyne Distillery and sold 1852. A long chain of owner operated the distillery beginning with Peter MacNee, William Hay & Co. (from 1857), W. Hay Jr. (from 1869), William Smyth (from 1870) who also renamed it to Glendarroch, Kemp & Co. (from 1879), William Giles (from 1884), Scotch Whisky Distillers Ltd. (from 1887) who re-instated the Glenfyne name, William Foulds & Co. (from 1890) and finally Glenfyne Distillers Co. (from 1919). Last owner closed the distillery as late as 1937. It was situated in beautiful surroundings and located uphill from Crinan Canal, below the Achnagbreach Hill in Ardrishaig of Argyll. With 1 wash, 2 spirit Pot stills and 5/5.500 gallon washbacks it had an annual production average of 80.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from the Ard Burn. The facility was used as warehouse for many years and the large distillery reservoir as a fish hatchery. Only trace left is wall facing the canal. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. Shortly after his visit the distillery was re-named Glenfyne.

34. Glenfoyle (Highland).
Aka Dasherhead, Gargunnock, Westerkepp. Founded 1795 by David Cassells whose son John took over 1813. In 1825 it was split in two distilleries; Easterkepp and Westerkepp. Weterkepp was sold to Robert Bell in 1826 who passed it further to Andrew Chrystal and John McNee. John Cassells retained Easterkepp and gave it up 1842 for final rest. Westerkepp survived and was managed by the Chrystal family from 1826 until 1870 the name changed to Glenfoyle during this period. In 1870 it was acquired by John Johnston owner of Glenpatrick (Gleniffer) and ten years later ownership was transferred to James Calder, the owner of Bo'ness. He survived the tough years but gave up 1921 and sold out to John Dewar & Sons who closed the distillery in 1923. The warehouses were used for several years and last by Invergordon group who to took over the site in 1971. It was located four miles west of Stirling in the village Gargunnock of Stirlingshire and north of the 'Highland Line' hence it was classed as a Highland Whisky. Last owner Invergordon (1971). With its 2 Pot stills and 6/2-2.500 gallon washbacks it had an annual production average of 30.000 gallons. Water for process was a drawn trough closed pipe from Campsie Fells. Part of the distillery house is now a private residence. Other parts of the distillery still stand too. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

35. Glengyle (Campbeltown).
Founded 1873 William Mitchell & Co. Absorbed in 1919 by West Highland Malt Distillers Ltd. and closed by them in 1925. It was located at Glebe Street about a mile from the wharf in the suburbs of in Campbeltown, but took its name from a nearby street. With its 2 Pot stills and 6/6.600 gallon washbacks it had an annual production average of 90.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from the Crosshill Loch. Some years after the closing the empty warehouses was purchased by Craig brothers and made into an automobile workshop. The distillery was bought in 1941 by the owner of Glen Scotia distillery who planned to revive it. Nothing came out. In 1957 a new salvator emerged with plans to revive the distillery, but to no avail. The distillery still stands and is the best preserved of all former distilleries in the town. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

36. Gleniffer (Lowland).
Aka Glenpatirck. Founded 1833 as by Alexander Speirs, Laird of Elderslie who leased it to James Hodge. By economic reason he gave up voluntarily in 1837 and was succeeded by James MacFarlane who operated the distillery until 1845 when it was sub leased to J Guild & Son. They ran the business until 1851 when it was sold to William King who went bankrupt in 1854. After a brief idleness the distillery was leased to J. Morrison who ran it for ten years and changing its name (1858) to Gleniffer under which it operated until its final closing in 1894. It was located beside the Patrick Burn which flows down the Gleniffer Braes from Hartfield moss to the Black Cart river in Elderslie, Paisley of Renfrewshire. With its 2 spirit Pot and an annual production average of 70.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from the Glen Burn. Demolished and overgrown, but Glenpatrick and Gleniffer Houses still stands. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

37. Glenmavis (Lowland).
Founded 1795 by David Simson who was incorporated Wark & Simson. Company dissolved 1826 and taken over by J & W Reid for short period 1829-1833. From 1833 it was owned by John MacNab until it closed in 1910. It was located in Bathgate of West Lothian about 20 miles from Edinburgh. A Coffey patent still replaced the Pot still in 1855. This was one of sites that produced Single Malt Whisky with the help of a Coffey continuos still. With its Coffey still and 6/4.400 gallon washbacks it had an annual production average of 80.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn sources in the distant hills. Now completely demolished, replaced with a residential building. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

38. Glen Nevis (Campbeltown).
Founded 1877 by Duncan MacCallum who was the mastermind behind other distilleries as well. It operated under his supervision until it was sold of to Scotch Whisky Distillers ltd. in 1987 but reverted back Mr MacCallum when SWD collapsed in 1889. In 1896 it was again sold. This time to Stewart Galbraith and Co. owner to (Glen) Scotia. Later, 1919, it came in the hands of West Highlands Malt Distillers Ltd. who finally closed it down in 1923. It was located at the bottom of Gallow Hill fronting Glebe Road in Campbeltown and was given a name with a familiar name like Ben Nevis and Nevis but had nothing in common with these. With its 2 Pot stills and 6/6.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production average of 100.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Crosshill Loch. It is today completely demolished and the land is part of a contractor's yard. The warehouses were used for a period in time as by Ardlussa. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

39. Glenochil (Lowland).
Aka Dolls, West Dolls. Founded 1746 as dolls by and later operated by John Philip until 1834, name changed to Glenochil when the distillery was taken over by the MacNab Brothers & Co. The MacNabs contributed to the formation of the DCL in 1877. The distillery was located in Menstrie near Stirling in Clackmanshire. Converted to a Grain distillery in 1846 by replacing the Pot Stills with a Stein still. The Stein still was replaced with a Coffey still years before Barnard's visit 1887. With its Coffey still and many, according to Barnard, washbacks it had an annual production average of 1.000.000. Water was drawn from Balquhan Burns. Closed before turn of the century. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

40. Glenside (Campbeltown).
Founded 1834 by David Anderson and three partners. The partnership was dissolved in 1844 and the assets sold to a group who incorporated the firm 'Glenside Distillery Co.'. Via various owners it became a limited company in 1908. After WW I the majority of the shares were acquired by Robertson & Co who closed the distillery 1926 and dissolved it 1930. It got its name from the road were it was located, Glenside Road in Campbeltown. With its 2 wash and 1 spirit Pot still and 4/8.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 70.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Auchalochy Loch whereas other local distilleries draw their water from the city mains fed with water from the Crosshills. It is now completely demolished and no traces are left. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

41. Glenskiach (Highland).
Founded 1896 by and operated during it life cycle by John Ross. The production came to complete stop in 1926 and the company was dissolved 1932. It was built on the River Skiach south of Evanton in Easter Ross. In 1929 the dormant distillery was severely damaged by a bad fire. 1933 demolished it and some of its stones contributed to the building of a bridge across the river Averon. Some of the building still remains being converted into living quarter during the 30's. Nothing is known regarding equipment or production figures at the time of writing. Not visited by Alfred Barnard.

42. Glentarras (Lowland).
Founded 1839 by James Kennedy, acquired by Glentarras Distillery Co incorporated for the take-over in 1872. The company controlling block of shares was owned by the Twentyman family and a family member also became the acting manager. In 1881 the company was dissolved and control passed to Percy Browne with John Twentyman continuing as manager. In 1903 the company was bought by Seager, Evans & Co. who ceased production in 1905. Formal closing occurred in 1914. The distillery was located at the River Tarras approximate four miles from Langholm in Dumfriesshire. With its 4 Pot stills and 8/8.000 gallon washbacks it had an annual production of 75.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from the Gaulsike stream. Demolished, overgrown but some relics traceable. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

43. Grandtully (Highland).
Aka Granthly. Founded 1825 by the company A. Campbell & Co and J. Kennedy & Co. it was taken over by W MacFarlane & Co. in 1827 and further by a chain of owner for shorter periods until it came in the hands of the Thomson family 1837, who ran it to its bitter end in 1910. It was located three miles from Grandtully near Aberfeldy in Pertshire and the absolute smallest distillery in the United Kingdom at the time. With its 2 very small Pot stills and 3 small washbacks it had an annual production of 5.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from the Cultilloch Burn. Demolished and no traces left. Grand Tully is a name now used by Marshall Wineries for new-fill purchased from Speyside; a distillery built in 1990. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

44. Grange (Lowland).
Founded 1786 by converting a brewery, that in its turn was founded 1767. The Young family on whose premises the distillery stood was the formal owners for the duration of the distillery. It was either leased to outsiders or operated by family members. Became incorporated as William Young & o in 1888 and became a member of the five musketeers who formed the Scottish Malt Distiller Ltd. in 1914. Only to became engulfed by the mighty DCL after the war. And as usual put to rest by them which occurred in 1925. It was located in Burntisland of Fife. With its 2 Pot stills and 10/6.000 washbacks it had an annual average production of 200.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Binn and the Lonsdale Burns. Warehouses were in frequent use until 1987 but demolished in 1990. Several relics remain, such as the large cast-iron reservoir. Probly the first site for the Coffey still. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

45. Greenock (Lowland).
Founded 1795 by converting a brewery that in its turn was founded some decades earlier. First registered distiller was James Blair & Co. They ran it until 1920 when the name the incorporated name was changed to Greenock Distillery Co. by the new licensee John Dennistoun. In 1829 he was replaced by partners J. Rennie & J Ballantine who was the owners for the following almost sixty years. In 1896 it was acquired by J. Thorne & Sons Ltd., owner of Aberlour. They struggled through the 1909 fiscal problems imposed by Lloyd George and the WW I only to liquidate in 1915. The distillery was located on Tobago Street in Greenock of Renfrewshire. With its 2 Pot stills and 8/5.500 washbacks it had an annual average production of 130.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Lochgryfe. Demolished without trace. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

46. Hazelburn (Campbeltown).
Founded in 1796 and originally stood in Longrow. Taken over by M & D Greenlees and A Colvill who rebuilt a new and larger distillery in Millknowe Street the northward outskirts of Longrow street in Campbeltown Was operated by the Greenlees until 1920 and then acquired by Mackie & Co. who became White Horse Distillers Ltd. 1924 and amalgamated with DCL 1927. White Horse closed the distillery 1925. With its 1 wash and 2 spirit Pot stills and 9/6.000 washbacks it had an annual average production of 192.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from city mains and two deep wells on the premises. Warehouses used by DCL for many years. The premises are today a business area and most of its structures are demolished. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

47 Isla (Highland).
Aka Clockserrie. Founded 1851 by Alexander Forbes who converted a former brewery on the site to a distillery. He named it Clockserrie and it was in his family's possession until 1920. Sometime during this era it was renamed Isla. In 1920 it was acquired by Tay Distillers Co. They went into liquidation 1923 and the distillery was taken over by DCL who closed it in 1926. Located in Perth where the Strathmore and Islay roads converged and near the bridge across the River Tay. With its 2 wash and 2 spirit Pot stills and 4/4.000 washbacks it had an annual average production of 30.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from a small stream nearby and from the Tay. Demolished with no trace left. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

48. Kinloch (Campbeltown).
Founded 1823 by he firm Lamb, Colvill & Co. was located on Saddell Street off Longrow Street in Campbeltown, fronting Kinloch Park. It stayed in the hands of the founders and their ancestor until the death of David Colvill in 1918. Following year the company was sold to West Highland Malt Distillers Ltd. who collapsed in 1924 and the assets was taken over by David MacCallum who only managed to ran it for a short period and finally closed the distillery in 1926. Unable to sell it, due to the bad times, he offered it to the town council in 1928 as building land. The offer was accepted and Park Square was built on its site and nothing was left of the distillery and its structures. As x street, leading to the square, was named after Mr Maccallum. With its 3 Pot stills and 8/7.400 washbacks it had an annual e production of 97.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from city mains one wells on the premises. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

49. Kintyre (Campbeltown).
Founded 1832 but license given as early as 1826 John Beith who died in 1840 and was succeeded by his son John. He incorporated the business with John Ross and John Colville as partners and ran until 1876 when the partnership dissolved. From then on it was ran by John Ross & Co. until its closing in 1920. It was located on Broad Street in the Lochend area of Campbeltown and a rather small distiller. During the period 1825-1887 it pooled its resources with Longrow distillery. With its 3 Pot stills and 6 washbacks it had an annual production of 67.000. gallons. Water for process was drawn from a well and some from an uphill Loch. Nothing remains today and the site is used for a municipal housing. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

50. Kirkliston (Lowland).
Aka Lambsmiln. Founded 1795 by G Simpson & Co who in owned it for the period 1795-1799 next owners were William Gibb and then A.H. Rennie who in turn sold it in 1825 to Andrew Stein of the Stein distilling and inventing dynasty. So it was here one of the first Stein continuous output with its triple malt still was installed. A method that later on was refined by Aneas Coffin. It was not a success and the company was liquidated in 1831. Reconstructed, operations resumed next year but for one year only now under the name 'Patent Distillery Co.'. The following twenty years Buchanan & Co. managed it with several partners. This group removed the Stein still in 1850 and replaced it with traditional Pot stills. In 1855 the distillery was sold further to the firm John Stewart & Co. who again reversed the means of distilling. This time a Coffey continuos still was installed beside the Pot still line. In the 1880's Kirkliston dismantled its Pot Stills and became a Grain whisky distilling unit. Stewart & Co was one of the founding fathers of DCL in 1877. DCL closed Kirkliston in 1920 but used its facilities mainly for yeast production. It was located in the village Kirkliston eight miles from the centre of Edinburgh and on the river Almond and not far the home of Drambuie. With its 6 Pot stills and one Coffey still, 14/18.000 washbacks it had an annual production of 700.000. gallons. Water for process was drawn from Craigmaiellen and Humbie burns. Some buildings remain. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

51. Langholm (Lowland).
Founded1765 by John Arnot & Co. it was one of the oldest distilleries of its time when visited by Barnard. Due to bad crops the years around 1795 it was converted to a paper mill. John Arnot restored it to distilling in 1818 but ran twofold into financial distress and had to sell out in 1832 to John Connell. The Connell family operated the distillery nearly a century but had to close down in 1917 due to the war and lack of barley. It was located on the east bank of river Esk a mile south of the village Langholm in Dumfriesshire. With its 1 wash and 2 spirit Pot stills it had an annual production of 46.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from the Witha Well. In 1926 the distillery was demolished but is thought that the water pipe to the distillery is still intact. A few other relics remain as well. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

52. Loch Katrine (Lowland).
Aka Camlachie (1834), Whitevale (1835) renamed Loch Katrine 1870. ( Not to be mixed with ' Loch Katrine Adelphi' aka Adelphi and Gorbal). Founded 1834 by the firm Coventry & Belsland who renamed it to Whitevale before it was sold further to James Guild in 1837. Hector Henderson purchased it 1847 and ran it until he had to liquidate in 1852, after a costly refurbishing in 1849. A new owner, Bulloch, Lade & Co. was a bit better off and managed to operated the distillery all the way to 1920 when it was absorbed by DCL and closed later the same year. It was during the Bulloch and Lade era, in 1870's, the name was changed to Loch Katrine. It was located in Glasgow on Camlachie Street and beside the Camlachie Burn, which was countryside at the founding days, but hefty urbanised at the days of Barnard's visit. With its 4 Pot stills and 11/18.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 300.000 gallons. Water for process was initially drawn from Camlachie Burn but later switched to the Loch Katrine. Demolished without a trace. Some small commercial buildings are now erected on the site. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

53. Lochhead (Campbeltown).
Founded 1824 by the brother Archibald and Dan McMurchy on the remains of illicit stills and a brewery. In 1833 it was sold to the Taylor family who operated it until 1895 when it was acquired by J.B. Sheriff & Co. The new owner had a stake in Lochindaal on Islay and Rum distilling interest on Jamaica. Sheriff made a massive investment and expanded the works in 1900 and 1905, which did not pay off. Lochhead was taken over by DCL the when Sheriff folded in 1920. Final year of operation was 1928. The distillery was located on Lochend Street and close to Kinloch Park in Campbeltown. With its 2 Pot stills and 8/8.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 111.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from a small stream running through and an adjacent Burn. Demolished without trace. A supermarket and car park now occupies the premises. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

54. Lochindaal (Islay).
Aka Port Charlotte and Rhins. Founded 1829 by Colin Campbell quickly followed by six short term operators ending with W Guild & J.B. Sheriff in 1855. Sheriff who had a stake in Lochhead in Campbeltown too continued to running the operation after the partnership was dissolved in 1855 and kept it going until it was purchased by Benmore Distillery in 1920. Benmore was engulfed by DCL 1929 who closed and dismantled Lochindal the same year. For some years the warehouses were rented by MacLeay Distillers Ltd. and the malt burns by Islay Creamery. As late as 1948 there were attempts to revive the distillery. It was located in Port Charlotte on the west side of the bay after which the distillery was named. Nearest neighbour was Bruichladdich. With its 3 Pot stills and 8/10.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 127.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Garroch and Octomore Lochs. Most of the buildings stand as today. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

55. Lochruan (Campbeltown).
Founded 1835 by the brothers Charles and Robert Johnston who sold it in 1867 John and William McKersie, owner of Albyn in Campbeltown. The McKersie invested in a major rebuilding and was successful until the Lloyd George's duty increase in 1909 but struggled on until 1919. That year the distillery was acquired by J Buchanan & Co. who in 1925 was absorbed by DCL and distilling stopped immediately thereafter. For a short period (1910) experiment with continuous distilling of malt whisky was carried out. In the 1930's the site was converted to council housing. It was located in Princess Street near the quay and close to Kinloch Park. With its 3 Pot stills and 7/6.700 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 85.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Lochruan (Red Loch). Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

56. Longrow (Campbeltown).
Founded 1824 by the triumvirate John Ross, John Colville and John Beith. John Ross & Co. became the sole owner in 1876. As owners to Kintyre as well, they ran both distilleries in tandem for along period. The distillery took its name from the street were it was located, Longrow street of Campeltown was the most important street in Campbeltown at the time. When John Ries died, in 1886, Longrow was acquired by W & J Greenlees. As the location, on Longrow street, made it impossible to expand and modernise the distillery it was shut down in 1896. Only visible remains today is one of its bonded warehouses today used by Springbank as a bottling plant. The distillery name is re-used by Springbank for special version of Springbank single malt whisky. With its 2 Pot stills and 6/6.700 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 40.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from city mains it is believed. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

57. Meadowburn (Campeltown).
Founded 1824 and operated by W. Armour & Co from 1825. Entered a partnership 1828 with Kirkwood, Taylor & Co. lasting to 1840. The remaining partners continued operation. Acquired by Robert Colvill & Co. in 1854. Last confirmed year of operation is 1882. However, it might have been in operation on and of until 1886. No trace left. A private villa occupies the site today. No technical information available. Water may have been drawn from the Crosshills Loch. Definitively closed when Barnard visited Campeltown. Not visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887

58. Nevis (Highland).
Founded 1878 by Donald P. McDonald as an extension to his nearby Ben Nevis distillery. The distillery was located a half mile from Fort Williams on the banks of river Nevis. Closed 1908, probably due to the expected rise in duty, and amalgamated with Ben Nevis. The warehouses are used by Ben Nevis. With its 2 wash 5 spirit Pot stills and 2/17000 plus 6/8.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 260.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Buchan's Well near the summit of Ben Nevis the highest peak in Britain. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

59. Parkmore (Highland).
Founded 1894 by the Parkmore Distillery Co. set up for the occasion. Quickly fell into hardship and was taken over by James Watson & Co. Ltd. in 1900 who in turn was acquired by John Dewar & Sons ltd. in 1923. Became absorbed by DCL in 1925 who passed it further to SMD in 1930 who closed it 1931.The blending firm Daniel Crawford & Son Ltd. (brand Ben Wavis) had a non-used license to operate the distillery as late as 1940 but only used the warehouses. As still standing it is said to be the best preserved survivor of the before-turn-of-the-century whisky boom. It is located just outside of Dufftown, very close to Glendullan distillery, which is not far from the Glenfiddich distillery. Means of production and production figures are not known at the time of writing. Not visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887!

60. Pollo (Highland)
Founded 1817 by W.B Rose. Taken over by John Ross & Co (also at Balblair) for the period 1826-1896. Andrew Ross & Son operated the distillery until its closing in 1903 .Means of production and production figures are not known at the time of writing. In 1821 the distillery was listed for local production (Scotland) only. Production figures were 3447 gallons. Not visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887!

61. Provanmill (Lowland).
Aka Mile End and surely Milltown. Founded 1815, operated by William Kirkland from 1825 and John Morrison from 1849, then R Simpson & Co until 1860 when it was acquired by Moses Risk & Sons Ltd. and stayed in the family until it wound up in 1922 and never distilled again. The assets were bought by Provanmill Bonding Co. Ltd., which went into liquidation 1929. It was located north west of Glasgow near the motorway to Stirling and between Blackhill House and Riddrie. The distillery was demolished in 1953 and Littlehill primary School was erected on the site 1960. With its 3 Pot stills and 8/3-12.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 130.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Hogganfield Loch. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

62. Rieclachan (Campbeltown).
Founded 1825 by, J. Ferguson, J. Harvey, A. Mitchell and A. Wylie and incorporated as Wylie, Mitchell & Co. The Mitchell family became the possessor and ran the company for the one hundred and ten years to come. The distillery became silent 1934 and was the last of an era to close before the darkening times and with WW II around the corner. It was located at the head of Longrow street in Campbeltown. Today the site is occupied by a supermarket. With its 2 Pot stills and 7/5.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 70.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Crosshill Loch. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887. (Collector 1).

63. Saucel (Lowland).
Aka Paisley. Founded 1793 as Paisley by Messrs Flemming and Bochop as a combined brewery and distillery it is believed. In 1825 it was acquired by J. Stewart & Co and came under the DCL umbrella 1903. When the war broke out the production halted. In 1915 (October 16) a great fire wiped out the production buildings but spared the warehouses with their liquid gold. DCL never restored it. The distillery was located at the bend of the river Cart in Paisley of Renfrewshire. It is not known when the name change occurred. In 1885 a Coffey patent still for Grain distilling was installed but removed it 1903 by order of DCL. The warehouses were used for the coming seventy years but later replaced with a supermarket complex with no trace left. With its 18 Pot stills a Coffey patent still and 20/12-45.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 1.000.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Oldbar Burn and a bore on site. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

64. Speyside (Highland).
Founded in 1895 by George Grant and had a short life span. The name was revived by Speyside Distillery & Bonding Co, formed 1955. They founded a distillery 1987 from which the first spitir ran 1990. Old Speyside stopped distilling sometimes before 1911, the year it went into liquidation. The equipment was dismantled and some of it went to Dalwhinnie. All buildings except one, now used a Masonic Hall, were demolished. The site is now a car park. With its 2 Pot stills and 6/9.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual capacity of 80.000+ gallons it is believed. Water for process was drawn from Gynack Burn. Not visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

65. Springside (Campbeltown).
Founded 1830 by John Colvill and remained within the family until it finally closed in 1926. This tiny distillery, the smallest in town was situated off Burnside Street in Campbeltown. Almost all are demolished and the only remains are a supporting wall that once was a part of the bonded warehouse. With its 2 Pot stills and 6 washbacks it had an annual production of 30.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Crosshill Loch. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

66. Strathdee (Highland).
Founded 1821 by Henry Ogg. His son henry took over and ran it until 1895. That year it was acquired by David Walker who ran until 1915 when it became incorporated as Strathdee Distillery Co. later (1920) bought by Robertson & Co who merged with Train & McIntyre in 1925. Train & McIntyre became a part of National Distillers of America who mothballed it during WW II and never re-opened it. Last distillation is believed to have occurred not later than 1942. The distillery was situated on Deerside, Balmoral Road in Aberdeen. Now it is demolished without a trace. There is now a garage and car show room on the premises. With its 12 wash, 1 spirits Pot stills and 5/2.800 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 55.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from Manofield Burn and city mains. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

67. Stromness (Highland/Orkney).
Aka Man O'Hoy. Founded 1817 by John Crookshanks who was replaced as owner six times during forty years. It went into a silent period from the mid 1860's to 1878 when it was bought and restored by the MacPherson brother. Who renamed the distillery to Man O'Hoy and its whisky to Old Orkney. Circa 1905 is was acquired by J & J McConnell Ltd. who operated it through the bad years of the 20's but had to give it up 1928. It was located on Orkney near the city of Kirkvall. Stood in the village of Stromness, from which it took its name, and near the dark waters of Scapa Flow. The distillery became completely demolished in 1940 without traces. The site is now occupied by housing. With its very small 2 Pot stills and 4/2.200 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 7.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from May Burn. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887 (he is not correct regarding the starting year and owner).

68. Stronarchie (Highland).
Founded 1900 by Alexander & Macdonald. Acquired by J Calder & Co. 1907. Then taken over by Macdonald, Greenlees & Williams Ltd 1920. Engulfed by DCL in 1926 and put to rest 1928. It was located between the hills of Slungie and Dochrie on a small tucked away road between Forgandenny and Milnathort in Pertshire. Now completely demolished in the 1950's. A few lines of stone on the site are all that remains. Means of production and production figures are not known at the time of writing. Except that water for process was drawn from Chapel Burn. Not visited by Alfred Barnard. (Collector 1).

69. Tambovie (Lowland).
Founded 1825 by Alexander Graham who operated it until 1860 followed by Alexander Buchanan who went into finical difficulties The new owner, David Chrystal, ran it 1887-1890, following owners Alexander Ferguson 1890-1891, McNabs 1896-1903 and finally the incorporated Tambowie Distillery Co from 1904 to 1914 when it finally closed after a devastating fire. It was located near Milngavie north west of Glasgow. The distillery was demolished in 1921. Some workers cottage and the houses of the manager and excise man still stands. With its 2 Pot stills and 4/4.200 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 48.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from springs in the Tambovie Hills. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.

70. Towiemore (Highland).
Founded 1896 by Peter Dawson acquired in 1898 by the Towiemore-Glenlivet Co who ran it until 1930 and liquidated that year. Assets sold to SMD same year who closed the distillery but used the maltings for many years. Located near the old railroad in Botriphnie of Banffshire. Some buildings still stands. Means of production and production figures are not known at the time of writing. Not visited by Alfred Barnard. (Collector 1).

71. Yoker (Lowland).
Founded 1770 by John Harvey it belonged to the Harvey family through its existence but had to liquidate in 1906. A business consortium bought and sold to yet another group in 1913. In turn they were bought by Dewar, Buchanan and DCL group in 1918. DCL gained full control in 1925 and shut it down 1927. The warehouses were in use until WW II but badly damages during the Clyde Blitz of 1941 and nothing remains today. The distillery was a Grain distillery but able to produce malt whisky with its Stein still. It was located in Glasgow near the north bank of Clyde in the village from which it took its name. With its 2 Coffey and 1 Stein patent stills and 3/25.000, 1/17.000 plus 12/10.000 gallons washbacks it had an annual production of 600.000 gallons. Water for process was drawn from the Yoker Burn, Loch Katrine and well on-site. Visited by Alfred Barnard, 1887.



SPECIAL STUDY
Isly distilleries lost before Barnard's visit to Islay.

This is my list concerning licensed distilleries on Islay that became obsolete before Barnards journey (1885-1887). Hence, Malt Mill and Port Charlotte (Lochindaal, Rhins) are excluded (ruins remains for both).
I believe my Islay-list is complete. The majority, with some errors, are included in Moss and Hume and Craig's books. I have access to more data on several of the distilleries.

0 Ardmore (1817-1835)
Incorporated with Lagavulin 1837.
No buildings left.

0 Ardenistiel (1837-1852)
(also known as Islay Distillery and Kildalton Distillery).
Incorporated with Laphroig (not Lagavulin as Moss & Hume claims).
Their kilns are on Laphroigs premisses.

0 Bridgend (pre 1800 - 1822)
(also known as Killarow Distillery, changed name to Bridgend approx 1818)
M&H thinks it was the same as Newton, it was not.
In Bridgend there are remains of the distillery.

0 Daill (1814-1830)
There are ruins left along the road between Port Askaig and Bridgend.

0 Freeport (? -1847?)
Precise location unknown).

0 Lossit (1826-1860, not 1867 as Moss & Hume claims)
Ruins south of the village Ballygrant (A846).

0 Mulendry (1826-1831).
Precise location unknown).

0 Newton (1818-1825)
Ruins are immediately south of A846 between Port Askaig
and Bridgend.

0 Octomore (1816-1852)
Ruins left.

0 Scarabuss (1817-1881)
No evidence that it ever went into production.

0 Tallant (1821 - 1852, not 1827 as Moss & Hume claims)
On the farm Tallant (farm still active), south of Bowmore.
No trace left.



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ulf@buxrud.se
Malmoe, Sweden on March 15, 1996
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